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Old School Making a Comeback- Crisco

We’re all familiar with the blue can – it was probably a staple in all our childhood kitchens. Lately, there has been a lot of chatter about the benefits of Crisco for your skin and hair. Sounds rather bizarre, doesn’t it? Let’s look at the ingredients of Crisco: Soybean oil, fully hydrogenated cottonseed oil, partially hydrogenated cottonseed and soybean oils. Because the oils are partially hydrogenated, they are solid at room temperature and have a fatty consistency that is lighter than butter (made up of saturated fats). So, basically, natural oils hydrogenated to turn them into solid form. I use natural oils on my skin and hair all the time-Jojoba Oil, Vitamin E Oil, Almond oil, Emu oil, Avocado Oil, and Grapeseed Oil. Because it is made up of oil, Crisco is not a moisturizer, but it’s a great sealant!!!! You dont’ need to use a lot of it to get great results either (a little goes a LOOOOONG way). If you’re heavy-handed with product though, then you can add cornstarch to your Crisco to keep it from feeling too greasy.

I have read that Crisco is used in hospital settings to treat burn victims and those with severe eczema. It has also been used on skin tears caused by edema (severe swelling due to fluid accumulation).

Through some internet research I discovered Julia’s Goat Milk Soap Company http://www.juliasgoatmilksoap.com/ . Julia create and sell Herbal and Vegatable Based Soaps with Crisoc as the base for an Homemade Eczema Treatment.

Outside of the medical community, countless women (and probably a few men) are using Crisco on their faces, bodies and hair – and reporting great results. And it’s cheap. Under $5 for the small can which should last a really long time.

Does anyone use Crisco on their hair presently, in a past life, or all of the above? Inquiring minds want to know.
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au naturale, bath, dry skin, epsom salt, hair, miss sixx, shampoo, splinter remover, sprains

13 Wonderful Ways to Use Epsom Salts


13 Wonderful Ways to Use Epsom Salts

Growing up, Epsom Salt was a staple item in our medicine cabinet. Mom was old school, no matter what the problem was outside of a broken bone.. You were instructed to soak in Epsom Salt and lay down. I remember after giving birth to my daughter, here come mom with her zip loc bag of Epsom Salt to the hospital- she demanded that I soak.. I was VERY hesitant-but I complied and GUESS WHAT? the soreness.. aches.. and pain.. went away.. Mama always knew best 🙂 Listed below are some NEW and OLD school uses for Epsom Salt (which can be purchased at you local drug store or retailer such as Walmart or target)

* Relaxing and Sedative Bath – Soak in warm water and 2 cups of Epsom Salt.

* Face Cleaner – To clean your face at night, mix a half-teaspoon of Epsom Salt with your regular cleansing cream. Just massage into skin and rinse with cold water.

* Homemade Skin Mask – Apply the mask to damp skin. For normal to oily skin, mix 1 tablespoon of cognac, 1 egg, 1/4 cup of nonfat dry milk, the juice of 1 lemon, and a half-teaspoon of Epsom Salt. For normal to dry skin mix 1/4 cup of grated carrot, 1 1/2 teaspoons of mayonnaise and a half-teaspoon of Epsom Salt.

* Foot Soak
– Soothe aches, remove odors, and soften rough skin with a foot soak. Add 1/2 cup of Epsom Salt to a large pan of warm water. Soak feet for as long as it feels right. Rinse and dry.

* Skin Exfoliator – Massage handfuls of Epsom Salt over your wet skin, starting with your feet and continuing up towards the face. Have a bath to rinse.

* Remove Excess Oil from Hair – Epsom Salt soaks up excess oil from hair. Add 9 tablespoons of Epsom Salt to 1/2 cup of oily hair shampoo. Apply one tablespoon of the liquid to your hair when it is dry; rinse with cold water. Pour lemon juice or organic apple cider vinegar through the hair, leave on for 5-10 minutes, and then rinse.

* Hairspray – Combine 1 gallon of water, 1 cup of lemon juice, and 1 cup Epsom Salt. Combine, cover, and let set for 24 hours. The next day, pour the mixture into your dry hair and let it sit for 20 minutes. Then shampoo as normal.

* Hair Volumizer – Combine equal parts of deep conditioner and Epsom Salt. Warm in a pan. Work the warm mixture through your hair and leave on for 20 minutes. Rinse.

* Soak Sprains and Bruises – Epsom Salt will reduce the swelling of sprains and bruises. Add 2 cups Epsom Salt to a warm bath, and soak.

* Splinter Remover – Soak in Epsom Salt, it will draw out the splinter.

au naturale, dry skin, east african shea butter, miss naturale, miss sixx, moisturizer, raw shea butter, refined shea butter, west african shea butter

Benefits of Shea Butter

How can Shea Butter benefit me?

Shea Butter can provide relief from everything from just dry skin to many minor dermatological diseases (if you have a serious skin condition, you should see a doctor). It has been clinically shown to provide benefits. Here are some of the benefits of Shea Butter for the skin:

Daily skin moisturizer (face and body)
Dry skin relief
Dry scalp

Skin rash- including diaper rash
Skin peeling, after tanning
Blemishes and wrinkles
Itching skin due to dryness
Sunburn
Shaving cream to reduce razor irritation
Small skin wounds
Skin cracks
Soften tough skin on feet (especially heels)
Stretch mark prevention during pregnancy
Minor burns
Eczema
Sun and wind protection
Even skin tone
Reduce blemishes and scarring
Eliminating scalp irritation from dryness or chemical processing
Preventing bumps after shaving
Reducing acne (especially in combination with African Black Soap)
Absorbs quickly without leaving a greasy residue
Helps restore elasticity to skin
Restores luster to hair

How does Shea Butter benefit my skin?

Shea Butter nourishes the skin with Vitamins A, E and F. Vitamins A and E help maintain the skin and keep it clear and healthy. They are particularly helpful for sun damaged skin. They help prevent premature wrinkles and facial lines. Vitamin F acts as a skin protector and rejuvenator. It soothes rough, dry or chapped skin and helps soften dry or damaged hair. Shea Butter is high in unsaponifiables (a type of fat). Shea Butter has between 7-12% unsaponifiables. For comparison, avocado oil, a well known skin conditioner, has between 2-6%. This high level of unsaponifiables is one of the properties that makes Shea Butter so invaluable in treating the conditions listed above. Also, Shea Butter easily penetrates the skin allowing the skin to breathe and not clogging pores. Shea Butter has a high level of cinnamic acid, a natural sun screen. So, it provides some degree of protection from the sun. Shea Butter is also anti-inflammatory making it useful in treating rheumatism.

While we make no medical claims about our Shea Butter, we do have anecdotal evidence that it is very useful in treating minor skin conditions. We have had several customers who have used Shea Butter for eczema and/or psoriasis and told us it works as well as steroids at a fraction of the cost and without the side effects. We have a customer with an allergy to the sun. When she began using our Nubian Heritage Shea Butter lotion (not even pure Shea Butter), she accidentally discovered that it prevented the rash she normally would get from even a small amount of exposure to the sun.

How does Shea Butter benefit my hair?

Shea Butter provides moisture to dry or damaged hair from the roots to the very tips, repairing and protecting against weather damage, dryness and brittleness. It also absorbs quickly and completely into the scalp to rehydrate without clogging pores. It is particularly beneficial for processed and heat-treated hair. It is an excellent treatment for dry scalp. It restores luster to damaged hair.

Is all Shea Butter the same?

All Shea Butter is not the same. Shea Butter loses some of its healing properties as it sits on the shelf, so very old Shea Butter is not as beneficial. Refining techniques will vary. Highly processed Shea Butter will not be as effective. Sometimes Shea Butter is mixed with other ingredients that reduce its benefits. Then, there are those products that add very little Shea Butter but prominently display “Shea Butter” on the label. While Shea Butter is not very expensive, you should be aware of products that claim to provide the benefits of Shea Butter and sell for very low prices. Many manufacturers are taking advantage of the Shea Butter buzz by adding a little Shea Butter to a very inexpensive product implying you can get the benefits of Shea Butter in their product.

What can I tell by looking at the label?

Ingredients on the label should be listed in the order from the ingredient that is the most to the least. Therefore, you should look for Shea Butter products that list Shea Butter early on the list of ingredients. You should know the ingredients before you buy any Shea Butter product and should buy from a reputable source. The more Shea Butter in a product, the greater the likelihood, you will receive the full benefits of Shea Butter.

What’s the difference between raw Shea butter, refined Shea butter and highly refined Shea Butter?

The differences between raw, refined and highly refined Shea Butter lie in how the Shea Butter is extracted from the nut and how it is processed after that. Manual extraction processes leave more of the raw ingredients in the Shea Butter. After it is extracted, it can be further refined removing color and impurities that some people don’t like. This further refining can also remove some of the smell. You can think of the difference between raw Shea Butter and refined Shea Butter as being similar to the difference between wheat bread and white bread. Truly raw Shea Butter can even be unfiltered. That is one end of the spectrum. On the other end, there is Shea Butter that is extracted using chemicals that is pure white, has no smell and has lost a lot of its healing properties in the process.

All of our Shea Butter is mechanically extracted. No chemicals (other than water) are used in the process. Our raw Shea Butter is lightly filtered. But, retains its natural color and smell. Our Ultra Pure Shea Butter is refined. It is further processed by being put through clay filters and the odor is vacuumed out. It retains its healing properties and moisturizing ability.

Do I want raw Shea Butter or Refined Shea Butter?

This is really a matter of preference. I prefer raw Shea Butter. Unless you do not like the smell of Shea Butter, I recommend you go with raw. The more the Shea Butter is processed, the higher the chance some of the “good stuff” is going to be removed. Certainly, none of the healing or moisturizing properties of Shea Butter are enhanced by the further processing to make it white and odorless. If you do not like the smell of Shea Butter, try to get refined Shea Butter that is refined without the use of solvents. Or, you could try the East African Shea Butter, which has a much milder aroma than West African Shea Butter.

What about East African Shea Butter?

There is some confusion as to which shea butter is better, West African (Vitellaria Paradoxa) or East African (Vitellaria Nilotica). East African Shea Butter is different from that of the West African varieties in that it is higher in olein (the liquid part of the Shea Butter). Because of this, East African Shea Butter is softer and more fragrant than West African Shea Butter. The product is highly valued and gives Ugandan women farmers over five times the amount received by their West African counterparts. East African or Ugandan Shea Butter has a higher absorption rate due to lower saturated fatty acids. East African Shea Butter has less vitamin A and less sterols. For a natural vitamin A cream or to use for prevention of stretch marks, you might want to use West African Shea Butter. However, if you are looking for natural, intense moisturize, East African Shea Butter is the way to go.

East African or Ugandan Shea Butter is more rare than West African Shea Butter and is extremely difficult to find. When you do find it, it is selling up to the equivalent of $40 per two ounce jar on some websites. We are pleased that we can offer this premium quality Shea Butter to you at an extremely competitive price.

Ugandan Shea Butter is excellent for dry knees, elbows, rough hands and dry scalp. It is especially helpful for dry scalp, dermatitis eczema, sunburn and as a lip balm.

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OCM Cleaning Method

The Oil Cleansing Method

Today I decided to wash my face with olive oil and castor oil mix. I did a google search on natural facial cleaners and moisturizers after I broke out ONCE a gain with white heads. Of course I was itching to try it. I asked a few co workers about it and they were very informative. They provided and had mixed reviews; One co worker stated that she broke out around her hair line ( which was a concern because at the time, I had several white heads on my forehead and hair line), a second co worker raved about it and lets say she has the most beautiful skin I’ve ever seen. So I figured since I had the products at home in my make shift chemist lab ( the basement) I had to do it. Results:I like it. It left my face tight like I had washed and toned my face but still smooth and not dry looking. From the reading that I done that is probably the castor oil as that is suppose to be the one that pulls out the impurities.

What you need:
  • Wash Cloth
  • Extra Virgin Olive or Sun Flower Seed oil
  • Castor Oil
  • Flip top bottle/Container to keep the oils premixed.

The basic combination of oils for OCM is Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) or Sunflower Seed Oil and Castor Oil. The olive oil is for moisture, Sunflower Seed Oil has a more luxurious feel for massage. It sinks into the skin better, aiding the castor oil in transportation deep into the pores and allowing it to draw the dirt and grime to the surface of your skin where it can be wiped away. and the castor oil is the cleansing part. If you have dry skin, you would want to use more olive oil than castor oil. Say 75% olive oil, and 25% castor oil. Oily skin would be the opposite: 75% castor oil, 25% olive oil. I would start with 50/50 when you first start and then adjust.

The OCM Method:
1. On DRY skin, massage the oils all over your face and neck. Do this over makeup, dirt, whatever else is on your face. Take your time and really massage it in.
2. Take your washcloth and wet it with hot, or very warm water (the warmer the better so it can dissolve the oil better, but don’t burn yourself.) Wring it out and then drape it over your face. (This is steaming the pores) do this a couple of times.

3.As the washcloth cools, start wiping the oil off of your face. Rinse the washcloth and repeat as much as necessary.

4.After that, you can rinse your face in cool water.

5. If your face feels tight, you can apply your moisturizer. If it feels good, you don’t need to. You don’t have to use this method every time you wash your face. You can just do it before bed, or in the morning. I do it daily right before I shower. You will be very surprised that this actually works! Castor oil is known to be an excellent skin cleansing agent, but it is too drying for some skin. Extra virgin olive oil is rich in antioxidants and is an excellent moisturizer. Olive oil renews the skin, but it can be too fatty for oily skin types.

6. mix and store my mixture in a clean four-ounce flip-top bottle for convenience. When you go to replenish your oil blend, I suggest cleaning your bottle thoroughly with dish soap or the dishwasher. Better yet, if you can replace the bottle, this is ideal. We want to be extremely cautious in introducing bacteria to the bottle.