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Did you know that October recognizes -Lupus Awareness| Domestic Violence Awareness|Breast Cancer Awareness

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October 12, 2011 by The Lupie Chick

October is Lupus Awareness Month ( Canada)…
yet lupus remains under-recognized and under-funded

The first new treatment in 50 years has brought increased awareness across Canada of Lupus and its impact on patients and their families. This is great news for Lupus Canada and its provincial partners as we work towards a vision of life without Lupus. Known as ‘The Disease with 1000 Faces”, lupus affects tens of thousands of Canadian men, women and children. In October, lupus patients and supporters across Canada will recognize Lupus Awareness Month as a time to reflect on what all Canadians can do to increase awareness of this under-recognized and under-funded disease.

October marks Domestic Violence Awareness Month


Domestic violence is a serious problem that affects as many as 1 in 4 women in our country. It can happen to anyone at anytime at any point in their lives. Domestic violence can be defined as a pattern of abusive behaviors by an intimate partner. The one and only purpose of domestic violence is to gain complete control over another person. This can be done in many forms such as physical abuse, emotional abuse, verbal abuse, sexual abuse, financial abuse, and stalking.

The most dangerous point in an abusive relationship is leaving it, and the likelihood of violent assault may increase substantially during this time. Access to emergency services can be critical to a victim in transition. Even a cell phone without an active service plan can be used to call 911, meaning that help for these clients need never be far away.

The DC Coalition Against Domestic Violence accept working and non-working cell phones, cell phone batteries, and AC chargers. You can donate a phone without a charger as well. We cannot accept any cell phone accessories, such as car chargers, hands-free devices, or spare faceplates. You do not need to include your manual with your donation.

You may mail your cell phones to:
DCCADV Attn: Cell Phone Drive5 Thomas Circle NWWashington, DC 20005

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month


Breast cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the breast. It is considered a heterogeneous disease—differing by individual, age group, and even the kinds of cells within the tumors themselves. Obviously no woman wants to receive this diagnosis, but hearing the words “breast cancer” doesn’t always mean an end. It can be the beginning of learning how to fight, getting the facts, and finding hope.

Women in the United States get breast cancer more than any other type of cancer except for skin cancer. It is second only to lung cancer as a cause of cancer death in women.g a few minutes to do a breast self-exam a minimum of once a month can make a lifetime of difference.

Nearly 70% of all breast cancers are found through self-exams and with early detection the 5-year survival rate is 98%. If you find a lump, schedule an appointment with your doctor, but don’t panic—8 out of 10 lumps are not cancerous. For additional peace of mind, call your doctor whenever you have concerns.

HOW TO DO A BREAST SELF-EXAM

In the Shower
Fingers flat, move gently over every part of each breast. Use your right hand to examine the left breast, left hand for the right breast. Check for any lump, hard knot, or thickening. Carefully observe any changes in your breasts.

Before a Mirror
Inspect your breasts with your arms at your sides. Next, raise your arms high overhead.
Look for any changes in the contour of each breast, a swelling, a dimpling of the skin, or changes in the nipples. Then rest your palms on your hips and press firmly to flex your chest muscles. Left and right breasts will not exactly match—few women’s breasts do.


Lying Down
Place a pillow under your right shoulder and put your right arm behind your head. With the fingers of your left hand flat, press your right breast gently in small circular motions, moving vertically or in a circular pattern covering the entire breast. Use light, medium, and firm pressure. Squeeze the nipple; check for discharge and lumps. Repeat these steps for your left breast.

The information included on this blog is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan.

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