au naturale, cocoa butter, jojoba butter, jojoba oil, miss naturale, miss sixx, shea butter

Jojoba Butter – WHO KNEW????

I have been recently introduced to Jojoba Butter. I saw some at a health food store I visited earlier today. I’ve never heard of it before-It is 100% pure jojoba oil processed to be in a “butter” form. They had a sample jar and I tried a little bit of it.

It is very creamy and soft, much more so than cocoa butter. It felt like softened shea butter. It was white in color and didn’t have much of a smell. It was very rich and a little bit went a long way.

With the cold weather fast approaching, I thought that it might be good for my skin.

After some research- here is what I found out….

Jojoba Butter

Jojoba Oil is the most similar to sebum, the protective secretion from the skin’s sebaceous glands. Sebum lubricates and protects skin and hair. Jojoba provides similar benefits and is now available in butter form.

This natural butter is expeller-pressed from the fruit (nut) of the jojoba plant. This odorless butter makes it an ideal base for hair conditioners and suntan lotions.

Jojoba Butter contains protein, minerals, natural tocopherol, high content of eicosenoic acid, and long chain monounsaturated fatty acids, as well as a waxy substance similar to collagen. Hypo-allergenic and pure, Jojoba Butter is perfect for any skin type.

Common uses of Jojoba Butter

Creams
Lotions
Soaps
Pomades
After-Sun Creams and Lotions
Sun Protection Products
Hair Conditioners
Benefits of Jojoba Butter

Reduces wrinkles and stretch marks
Helps lighten and heal scars
Acts as a humectant by creating a protective film over skin and hair shaft that seals in moisture
Dissolves clogged pores and returns skin to natural pH balance
Penetrates pores and hair follicles rapidly to reduce water loss
Feels non-greasy
Aids spread ability and lubricity
Effective conditioner, moisturizer, and softener for skin and hair
Jojoba Butter

(Simmondsia Chinensis)

Jojoba Butter (Oil) comes from a shrub that grows well in the arid and semi-dry regions of southern California, Arizona, and northwest Mexico.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s